About Ann McKim


Ann McKim is generally known as the original clipper ship . It was built at Baltimore in 1833. It had never occurred to ship designers to build a large sleek craft based upon the Baltimore clipper up until 1832 when Isaac McKim (July 21,1775 - April 1, 1838) decided to try a very radical experiment. McKim was a leader in the commercial and industrial life of Baltimore. He contracted the prestigious Baltimore shipbuilding firm of Kennard & Williamson to build the ship of his dreams. This ship later was named for his wife.

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The Ann McKim was a strikingly beautiful ship and lived up to her proud owner's expectations.

"Her frame was of live oak and much mahogany and brass was used in decoration regardless of cost. She carried twelve brass cannon......Not only was she the best known American ship afloat at the time, but she was also conceded to be the fastest, and her swift passages led others to copy her. Thus, she was the first of many clipper ships built during the next twenty-five years culminating in ships like the Flying Clud." Robert E. Peabody, Models of American Sailing Ships.

Ann McKim was employed principally in the China and South American trade. In 1837, Ann McKim was sold to Howland & Aspinwall, New York. She sailed between Valparaiso and San Francisco, in 1849 and 1850. Later, Howland & Aspinwall sold her to Chile. Unfortunately, in 1852 she ended her days under the Chilean flag.

"It is reported that it is from her that the nations conceived their idea of building clipper ships which were to speed up the world's water-boren commerce." Keyworth J. Ernest. "The Port's Romantic Story."

Specifications


Clipper ship was built in 1833 at the shipyard of Kennard & Williamson, Baltimore with Dimensions: 143'x27'6"x14' and 494 tons.

"The vessell was of 493 tons register, which was a large ship for those days. The Ann McKim measured 143 feet in length, 31 feet in breadth, 14 feet deep and drew 17 feet aft and 11 feet froward.

Among the striking feature possessed by this ship, which were able also in common with the Baltimore clippers of that period, were the great deadrise at her midship section, long easy convex water lines, low free-board, and raking stem, stern-post and masts, making her really an enlarged clipper schooner rigged as a ship
." J. Ernest Keyworth, Hello Baltimore.

A Brief History Log of the Ann McKim


Ann_MckIm_lithograph.jpgAnn McKim, which was built on the enlarged lines of a Baltimore clipper, has often been called the first "true clipper", an honor she shares with Rainbow and Scottish Maid. She is faster than any existing European ship at the time and served in China trade.

1833 Launched and delivered to Isaac McKim, Baltimore. The ship was named after the owners wife.
1837 Sold to Howland & Aspinwall, New York, at the death of Isaac McKim.
1842 Sailed from New York to Anjer in 79 days.
1843 Sailed back to New York from Anjer in 96 days.
1847 Sold to Chile. 1
1849 January 20 Arrived to San Francisco from Valparaiso, via Guayaquil, after 51 days at sea.
1850 Sailed from San Francisco to Valparaiso in 47 days. 1851 September Left the United States under Captain Van Pelt for the last time.
1852 Broken up at Valparaiso.

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Read More About the Ann McKim


Books at Phillips Academy

Before the mast in the clippers; composed in large part of the diaries of Charles A. Abbey kept while at sea in the years 1856 to 1860 / by Harpur Allen Gosnell.
The Baltimore clipper; its origin and development, by Howard Irving Chapelle.
Before the mast in the clippers; composed in large part of the diaries of Charles A. Abbey kept while at sea in the years 1856 to 1860 / by Harpur Allen Gosnell.
Ships of the past, by Charles G. Davis; with an introduction by Irving R. Wiles. (Ann McKim p.160)

Books at Amazon.com and other locations

American Clipper Ships, 1833-1858: Malay-Young Mechanic (American Clipper Ships, 1833-1858) (Paperback) by Octavius T. Howe, Frederick C. Matthews

American Clipper Ships, 1833-1858: Adelaide-Lotus (American Clipper Ships, 1833-1858) (Paperback) by Octavius T. Howe, Frederick C. Matthews

Fast Sailing Ships: Their Design and Construction, 1775-1875 by David R. MacGregor

Additional Resources



*Because these articles and books are from subscription databases, they are only available to members of the Phillips Academy community.